How to Weather a Crisis of Faith

5 tips for weathering your first, second (or tenth) season of doubt.

Faith is not always easy to weather. It can feel light and breezy one day—with a string of hopeful and happy words: “Faith, hope and love.”

On others, it can feel like a giant weight you’re carrying around, making you wonder if you should drag it a little longer and see if it becomes light again or leave it behind and try life on without it.

Friends may share encouraging verses with you, like Hebrews 11:1 (“Faith is being sure of what we hope for ... ”), or tell you to sign up for more church activities in an attempt to get your questions answered more quickly. Sometimes this helps, but sometimes it doesn’t.

Whether you feel like you spend most of your time as a doubting Thomas or just occasionally go through a season of wondering whether what you believe is true, below are some tips for weathering what can be a truly scary experience. If you find yourself there, try to go easy on yourself, and see if you find any of the following tips useful.

Try to Approach Your Doubt as You Would Your Job.

What is meant by this is not to work “harder” at asking big life questions, which might make you feel more crazed than you already do. But rather to treat your faith—and your faith community—as you would your job in the sense of not being too quick to quit.

Try and be fair to yourself a doubting season: not expecting to accomplish or solve all things immediately, but rather willing to come back the next day to keep at it.

Even jobs you love can leave you hurting, frustrated or confused at times. But you wouldn’t necessarily put in your two weeks notice for something that has also brought you joy, supportive peers, a sense of purpose and meaning, stability and peace. The same should go for your faith.

Remember that you don’t do your whole job in one day’s time. Most jobs have hundreds of responsibilities, when you really break them down. A season of doubt in one’s faith isn’t (usually) solved in one day. There will be times of talking with friends and church leaders, journaling, walking, worshipping, and sometimes just being, before you find yourself on the other side.

Try and be fair to yourself a doubting season: not expecting to accomplish or solve all things immediately, but rather willing to come back the next day to keep at it.

Talk to People (and God), as Honestly as Possible.

Sometimes when you’re struggling to figure things out, you might be afraid to say certain things for fear of being blasphemous.

If faced with such feelings, try and think of this: If you believe (or are trying to believe) in a God who knows all your thoughts, feelings, and beliefs (or lack thereof), then it’s likely He isn’t going to punish you for talking honestly with a friend about something He already knows about.

Further, if you feel so upset about the state of your life that you don’t feel like you can have a “nice” conversation with God in prayer, try and journal your feelings, as if you were writing Him a letter. You also may find it helpful to pray/write that God would come in search of you, so it doesn’t feel so much like you’re working to muster up faithful feelings.

Let People Pray for You, Even if You’re Not Praying.

It’s nice to know people are praying for you in general. And if they sit with you and pray aloud, it can provide hope when you hear the confident voice of someone who believes what you are trying to believe. This is also a bit like sitting with a spiritual cheerleader—someone who is rooting for peace and contentment in your life.

The action of closing one’s eyes, quieting down, maybe touching the hands of the other person as you pray—all this can take your death grip off the steering wheel and help you to center and breathe.

Continue to Serve.

One thing you may struggle with during a season of doubt is not feeling authentic, especially with fellow brothers and sisters in Christ who may not seem like they’re struggling (word to the wise: there are more doubters among you than you may think). It can feel uncomfortable or even wrong to serve in your normal capacities in and outside of church.

You may find it helpful to pray/write that God would come in search of you, so it doesn’t feel so much like you’re working to muster up faithful feelings.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t.

It’s OK to remain a greeter on Sunday mornings, to sing in the praise band, to host a Bible study in your home. In fact, these things can keep you afloat. You don’t have to fake it and act like you’re totally on fire for God, but it’s better to have good company in a time of doubt—especially company with whom you can be honest and who will lift you up in prayer—than none at all.

Reflect on the Things of Your Faith That Aren’t so Hard for You to Believe

Finally, when you’re tired of throwing fists in the air, you may find relief in thinking of the things about God and the Bible that you are more confident in: that God is love; that self-control and patience are meant to help us; that when Jesus said to love people He was telling us the right thing to do.

And that He came for the broken, for those who sometimes struggle and wonder, but who ache to know Him (Acts 17:26-28).

Peace to you, my friends. May your doubting not be too long or painful, and may you come out on the other side feeling not so alone. Because you’re certainly not alone.

Top Comments

Jordan Vidrine

3

Jordan Vidrine commented…

What a breath of fresh air this article is.

Thanks!

Jo Jo

2

Jo Jo replied to Princess Luna's comment

So let me start by saying that I do not have all the answers. I open the bible and have questions just like you seem to have questions about it as well.

So I do not believe that just me, as a Christian, is messed up, broken, etc. I believe that all of humanity has done something wrong i.e. sinned. But that also has to do with what your standards are. I mean at the end of the day we all get our standards from somewhere. And I do honestly believe I am such a person because when the bible says things like it is wrong to lie, it is wrong to lust, it is wrong to steal, it is wrong to gossip, and so many other things I would just be lying to myself if I said I never did any of those things. Now the question comes down to whether or not I believe the Bible when it says that certain things are wrong. In the same way that a parent can tell their child that it is wrong to lie, the child can either believe what the parent is saying and try not lie or not believe what the parent is saying and just continue to lie knowing that their parents said its wrong.

I had to look up misanthropic because I was like what in the world is that lol. Well it seems like we look at this differently. Because, for me, the goal of these sins (bad things that we do) mentioned in the bible are to make us aware that there is such thing as good and bad. Just like the laws in America make us aware that hey, it is not okay to just murder someone and expect no consequence. Yes, there are some flaw things about the law system in America, but that is a whole other topic. But I hope you get what I am saying.

So my question to you is, since when is telling someone that something is wrong considered misanthropic. Now there are people who just love to judge others, but I am not speaking at them but just in general. And I think you are right when you say that Christians have a different definition of love, but it really is not all that different than the definition of love that non-Christians have. For example, if a parent tells their child that it is wrong to lie, cheat, steal, would we say that, that the parent is causing self-hatred in the child. I mean, I do not think that we would really see it that way. What do you think? When my mom was tells me things about myself that I do not like to hear, do I think that my mom hates me. For the most part no, although she was kind of mean at times lol. If a parent did not tell their kid about anything wrong that they were doing we would actually say that, that is a bad parent. So why can family and friends tell us when we do something wrong but not the Bible?

I am writing too much right now so I want to briefly touch on the fear-based incentive. What is wrong with fear exactly? So I do not see what is wrong with fear, so I want to understand your perspective. If I did not fear that driving over the speed limit would get me a big fat ticket then I would keep speeding and not follow the law. And when I know someone loves me I see fear as closely related to respect. When a child fears/respect their parent then they will listen to what they say. When a parent says come home by midnight they will do it because they fear/respect their parent and know that there parent is looking out for their own good.

Like many of things you have mentioned seem to be things that we accept in society in some way or another but then when it comes to God/Christianity doing similar things it seems to be a problem. So my brain just wonder why?

9 Comments

Jordan Vidrine

3

Jordan Vidrine commented…

What a breath of fresh air this article is.

Thanks!

s.t.mann

2

s.t.mann commented…

GOOD points to a very relevant issue!

if i may embellish the last two points from my own experience...the last point first - 'reflection' i myself find to be the MOST huge AND practical...on a day by day...moment by moment basis; the lack of faith...doubt...is not spontaneous combustion...it comes from somewhere...from the enemy! the enemy invariably first attacks us in the thought realm...and we must filter our thoughts! as a man thinketh within himself, so he IS! as a mirror reflects the face, so does the HEART of man (center of thinking) reveal the man; guard your heart with ALL diligence, for from it flows the essences of life!
Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy--meditate on THESE things. [ONLY these things!!]
be TRANSFORMED by the renewing of your mind...do not be conformed to the world!
sound familiar??

Now, #4 - 'serving'...here i have found it HUGE to serve not just in any old thing, but primarily in my areas of spiritual gifts! if i am a musician, i dont very often belong in the kitchen or in the office; hence - it is HUGE to know our spiritual gifts, and how our loving heavenly typically uses us!

grace and peace....

Heath Rumble

1

Heath Rumble commented…

Anyone reading this article, I urge you to embrace your doubts! Without doubt you will invariably become someone's pawn. What greater way is there to know truth than to open your mind to as much knowledge as possible, scrutinizing each new item, and eventually condensing it into a personal belief. By subscribing to faith you are excluding whole worlds of thought and claiming it's possible to know something for certain—that's a toxic mindset and you're right to be doubting it. You're sacrificing a reasonable and logical view of the world just to be more comfortable, but honestly, it's much more comfortable knowing that what you know is based in proof and reason, even if the truth (such as how small we are in the universe) seems scary at first. Please don't let the expectations of others decide how you think, we've been given the gift of reason—use it!

Princess Luna

53

Princess Luna replied to Heath Rumble's comment

Very well said. Rather than use guilt to prevent such doubts, one should use them to figure out why they were religious before. Why did you believe that? Why should you? Why do others? What do people who don't believe say and why?

Princess Luna

53

Princess Luna commented…

I have a few things to say in response, and to show that I read the whole article, I'll put it all in quotes, followed by my response. My responses will be surrounded with hyphens. The article will always come first. Let's begin:

"Faith is not always easy to weather. It can feel light and breezy one day—with a string of hopeful and happy words: 'Faith, hope and love.'

On others, it can feel like a giant weight you’re carrying around, making you wonder if you should drag it a little longer and see if it becomes light again or leave it behind and try life on without it."

-Faith is defined as a belief in something that is not backed up with testable or observed evidence. It is not a feeling, it is a belief. Also, why not try to live without it? It may be beneficial for you, as it was for me.-

"Friends may share encouraging verses with you, like Hebrews 11:1 (“Faith is being sure of what we hope for ... ”), or tell you to sign up for more church activities in an attempt to get your questions answered more quickly. Sometimes this helps, but sometimes it doesn’t."

-Instead of asking people within the group from which you are doubting, try getting information from someone who is not a believer. Watch and read some things by Richard Dawkins, or Christopher Hitchens, for instance. It's not only a new perspective, but it will let you gain new knowledge about what you believe in. If you're doubting, don't go to someone who will goad you with all his might to make you continue to believe.-

"Whether you feel like you spend most of your time as a doubting Thomas or just occasionally go through a season of wondering whether what you believe is true, below are some tips for weathering what can be a truly scary experience. If you find yourself there, try to go easy on yourself, and see if you find any of the following tips useful."

-Never use fear to prevent yourself from doubting and being inquisitive. 'Doubting Thomas' is such a condescending term, suggesting that critical thinking is somehow frightening and to be avoided.-

"Try to Approach Your Doubt as You Would Your Job.
What is meant by this is not to work “harder” at asking big life questions, which might make you feel more crazed than you already do. But rather to treat your faith—and your faith community—as you would your job in the sense of not being too quick to quit."

-Sure, don't be so quick as to jump to one belief or another, but never beat yourself up for doubting. Being doubtful about something is a good thing.-

"Try and be fair to yourself a doubting season: not expecting to accomplish or solve all things immediately, but rather willing to come back the next day to keep at it."

-Sure, ok? Treat a doubt like you would a hard math problem. Ingenious.-

"Even jobs you love can leave you hurting, frustrated or confused at times. But you wouldn’t necessarily put in your two weeks notice for something that has also brought you joy, supportive peers, a sense of purpose and meaning, stability and peace. The same should go for your faith."

-Suggesting that one cannot have support, joy, purpose, meaning, stability, or peace without that specific faith. Um, no, that's all accessible without it. The nonreligious community contains all of that without religion, and we would be glad to help you in any way we can.-

"Remember that you don’t do your whole job in one day’s time. Most jobs have hundreds of responsibilities, when you really break them down. A season of doubt in one’s faith isn’t (usually) solved in one day. There will be times of talking with friends and church leaders, journaling, walking, worshipping, and sometimes just being, before you find yourself on the other side."

-What 'other' side?-

"Talk to People (and God), as Honestly as Possible.
Sometimes when you’re struggling to figure things out, you might be afraid to say certain things for fear of being blasphemous."

-You've placed fear words in your own article. Well done.-

"If faced with such feelings, try and think of this: If you believe (or are trying to believe) in a God who knows all your thoughts, feelings, and beliefs (or lack thereof), then it’s likely He isn’t going to punish you for talking honestly with a friend about something He already knows about."

-Yeah, sure. Every Christian has something different to say about this depending on what their denomination is. If he is real, how do you know what he's like? Have you met him? Was it in the bible? Do you just feel it? I ask because this whole discussion about what god is like and how he feels is so varied that it's comical to a nonbeliever.-

"Further, if you feel so upset about the state of your life that you don’t feel like you can have a “nice” conversation with God in prayer, try and journal your feelings, as if you were writing Him a letter. You also may find it helpful to pray/write that God would come in search of you, so it doesn’t feel so much like you’re working to muster up faithful feelings."

-Praying to the being you're doubtful of won't help, but will only make you feel more guilty for ever doubting it.-

"Let People Pray for You, Even if You’re Not Praying.
It’s nice to know people are praying for you in general. And if they sit with you and pray aloud, it can provide hope when you hear the confident voice of someone who believes what you are trying to believe. This is also a bit like sitting with a spiritual cheerleader—someone who is rooting for peace and contentment in your life."

-Same as before, how will this help in the slightest? Why should these doubts not be explored, but pushed away in fear?-

"The action of closing one’s eyes, quieting down, maybe touching the hands of the other person as you pray—all this can take your death grip off the steering wheel and help you to center and breathe."

-Yes, let go of your 'control.' Give us your thoughts and obey.-

"Continue to Serve.
One thing you may struggle with during a season of doubt is not feeling authentic, especially with fellow brothers and sisters in Christ who may not seem like they’re struggling (word to the wise: there are more doubters among you than you may think). It can feel uncomfortable or even wrong to serve in your normal capacities in and outside of church."

-Stop calling it a 'season of doubt' like it's some disease.-

"But that doesn’t mean you can’t.

It’s OK to remain a greeter on Sunday mornings, to sing in the praise band, to host a Bible study in your home. In fact, these things can keep you afloat. You don’t have to fake it and act like you’re totally on fire for God, but it’s better to have good company in a time of doubt—especially company with whom you can be honest and who will lift you up in prayer—than none at all."

-I find that doubt works best with a break from prayer, church, and anyone who will strive to make you return to the flock. Please, embrace your doubts. If you remain a Christian, do it because of you, not because of guilt, fear, or pressure from peers and family.-

"Reflect on the Things of Your Faith That Aren’t so Hard for You to Believe

Finally, when you’re tired of throwing fists in the air, you may find relief in thinking of the things about God and the Bible that you are more confident in: that God is love; that self-control and patience are meant to help us; that when Jesus said to love people He was telling us the right thing to do."

-Faith, the belief in something without evidence. Believing anything on faith should be hard. If I claimed I lived with a Unicorn, why would you believe me? I have no proof, no evidence. You'd laugh at me and call me crazy. Any important belief should never be trusted on faith alone.

To clarify, some nonreligious beliefs and understands probably do contain some semblances of faith. However, things like evolution are not baseless as often described. It's not a faith-driven system, nor is it merely a 'guess' as suggested by the word theory. There is evidence and lots of it. So, when I say I am not a believer in god, it is because of this evidence and not from any fear, rebellion, hatred, or lack of religious understanding.-

"Peace to you, my friends. May your doubting not be too long or painful, and may you come out on the other side feeling not so alone. Because you’re certainly not alone."

-No, you're not. I'm a fellow doubter, and we can and do have a purpose outside of faith and religion. Explore these doubts and use them to learn and gain a better understanding of this vast and mysterious world around us. We only have one life. Better use it. We're not sheep.-

Jo Jo

2

Jo Jo replied to Princess Luna's comment

You said a lot, but I actually read through all of it because I thought what you said was interesting. I have tons of questions to ask you and I would be interesting in chatting with you about faith, logic, belief, and all that over stuff. Anyway, the one comment I did want to make now is about you saying the following:

"If I claimed I lived with a Unicorn, why would you believe me? I have no proof, no evidence. You'd laugh at me and call me crazy. Any important belief should never be trusted on faith alone"

If you told me you lived with a Unicorn, then I would most definitely laugh at you lol. I actually find that hilarious, so you are right. Now, in regards to why would I believe you that would not really matter to me. Whether you lived with a Unicorn or not does not change my life. So it would not be important for me to believe in it anyway. So I say this to say that people do not believe in Jesus just because. There is actually relevance to the belief. We are asked to believe so that we can be saved. Saved from what you ask? Saved from ourselves. Saved from our own sin. Saved from eternal punishment. So there is actually relevance to the belief if you actually believe that you are a sinner, amongst other things. So we are not just believing just for the sake of believing in something that we cannot see. We know how messed up humanity is. We believe that we are messed up and then we are putting our hope, trust, faith, assurance, and etc is someone who has the answer to the problem with human race, which is sin.

"Suggesting that one cannot have support, joy, purpose, meaning, stability, or peace without that specific faith."

And you are right about that one. I have seen many people who do not believe in Jesus have support, joy, purpose, meaning, stability, or peace. When being Christian, the focus of these things just change. For example, someone may find purpose in their job, spouse, family, changing the world, or whatever really depending on the person. With Christianity one now finds their purpose in Jesus and whatever Jesus desires of the individual. At the end of the day, Christians do not believe Jesus just for purpose, meaning, joy, and the others. So those things are not limited to Christians. Christians believe in Jesus because He loves us and died for us while we were still sinners..and more

I mean there is much more to say about this topic and I have much to say about everything you said. If you want to go back and forth on this, then I don't mind depending on the direction and point of the conversation.

Princess Luna

53

Princess Luna replied to Jo Jo's comment

Comments are fine by me. Since it's currently late here, I'll make a brief response to something you said about relevance.

"So I say this to say that people do not believe in Jesus just because. There is actually relevance to the belief. We are asked to believe so that we can be saved. Saved from what you ask? Saved from ourselves. Saved from our own sin. Saved from eternal punishment. So there is actually relevance to the belief if you actually believe that you are a sinner, amongst other things. So we are not just believing just for the sake of believing in something that we cannot see. We know how messed up humanity is. We believe that we are messed up and then we are putting our hope, trust, faith, assurance, and etc is someone who has the answer to the problem with human race, which is sin."

True, this would be relevant to the belief, but to someone like me who is not a believer, I see this as a fear-based incentive. To elaborate, exactly why do you believe that you, as a Christian, are messed, broken, a sinner, or need to be saved from yourselves? Do you honestly believe that you are such a person based on what an old book says?

When told something like this, I tend to find difficulty in taking it seriously because the words that are given are quite misanthropic. Yet, the goal of these words are in the 'name of love' or something. Perhaps Christians have a different definition of love, but the whole thing seems geared toward self-hatred rather than love.

Jo Jo

2

Jo Jo replied to Princess Luna's comment

So let me start by saying that I do not have all the answers. I open the bible and have questions just like you seem to have questions about it as well.

So I do not believe that just me, as a Christian, is messed up, broken, etc. I believe that all of humanity has done something wrong i.e. sinned. But that also has to do with what your standards are. I mean at the end of the day we all get our standards from somewhere. And I do honestly believe I am such a person because when the bible says things like it is wrong to lie, it is wrong to lust, it is wrong to steal, it is wrong to gossip, and so many other things I would just be lying to myself if I said I never did any of those things. Now the question comes down to whether or not I believe the Bible when it says that certain things are wrong. In the same way that a parent can tell their child that it is wrong to lie, the child can either believe what the parent is saying and try not lie or not believe what the parent is saying and just continue to lie knowing that their parents said its wrong.

I had to look up misanthropic because I was like what in the world is that lol. Well it seems like we look at this differently. Because, for me, the goal of these sins (bad things that we do) mentioned in the bible are to make us aware that there is such thing as good and bad. Just like the laws in America make us aware that hey, it is not okay to just murder someone and expect no consequence. Yes, there are some flaw things about the law system in America, but that is a whole other topic. But I hope you get what I am saying.

So my question to you is, since when is telling someone that something is wrong considered misanthropic. Now there are people who just love to judge others, but I am not speaking at them but just in general. And I think you are right when you say that Christians have a different definition of love, but it really is not all that different than the definition of love that non-Christians have. For example, if a parent tells their child that it is wrong to lie, cheat, steal, would we say that, that the parent is causing self-hatred in the child. I mean, I do not think that we would really see it that way. What do you think? When my mom was tells me things about myself that I do not like to hear, do I think that my mom hates me. For the most part no, although she was kind of mean at times lol. If a parent did not tell their kid about anything wrong that they were doing we would actually say that, that is a bad parent. So why can family and friends tell us when we do something wrong but not the Bible?

I am writing too much right now so I want to briefly touch on the fear-based incentive. What is wrong with fear exactly? So I do not see what is wrong with fear, so I want to understand your perspective. If I did not fear that driving over the speed limit would get me a big fat ticket then I would keep speeding and not follow the law. And when I know someone loves me I see fear as closely related to respect. When a child fears/respect their parent then they will listen to what they say. When a parent says come home by midnight they will do it because they fear/respect their parent and know that there parent is looking out for their own good.

Like many of things you have mentioned seem to be things that we accept in society in some way or another but then when it comes to God/Christianity doing similar things it seems to be a problem. So my brain just wonder why?

Princess Luna

53

Princess Luna replied to Jo Jo's comment

"So let me start by saying that I do not have all the answers. I open the bible and have questions just like you seem to have questions about it as well."

--My questions are geared more towards why people believe in it, but yes.

"So I do not believe that just me, as a Christian, is messed up, broken, etc. I believe that all of humanity has done something wrong i.e. sinned. But that also has to do with what your standards are. I mean at the end of the day we all get our standards from somewhere. And I do honestly believe I am such a person because when the bible says things like it is wrong to lie, it is wrong to lust, it is wrong to steal, it is wrong to gossip, and so many other things I would just be lying to myself if I said I never did any of those things."

--So, not to put words in your mouth, but are you trying to say that morality can only be gained by religion, specifically the bible?

"Now the question comes down to whether or not I believe the Bible when it says that certain things are wrong. In the same way that a parent can tell their child that it is wrong to lie, the child can either believe what the parent is saying and try not lie or not believe what the parent is saying and just continue to lie knowing that their parents said its wrong."

--I know what you mean, but not everything in the bible that's used as a rule has an obvious negative consequence upon the person who does it and others it affects. For instance, the bible says homosexuality is wrong, but besides that alone, there is no other reason to believe that it is wrong, especially now that we know more about it.

"I had to look up misanthropic because I was like what in the world is that lol. Well it seems like we look at this differently. Because, for me, the goal of these sins (bad things that we do) mentioned in the bible are to make us aware that there is such thing as good and bad. Just like the laws in America make us aware that hey, it is not okay to just murder someone and expect no consequence. Yes, there are some flaw things about the law system in America, but that is a whole other topic. But I hope you get what I am saying."

--I do get it, yes, but this good and bad struggle, especially within the bible, seems overly simplified and primitive. I say this because often punishments were severe, such as death, all based upon flimsy, unchanging rules. Our justice system isn't perfect by any means, but at least we no longer stone children for back-talking their parents.

"So my question to you is, since when is telling someone that something is wrong considered misanthropic. Now there are people who just love to judge others, but I am not speaking at them but just in general."

--When the bible says that we, as people, are broken, lost, and unworthy without Jesus in our hearts, that's misanthropic. When someone believes it, they essentially become a misanthrope even under the guise of love. It makes it worse if the alternative is eternal torture in some unclear realm.

"And I think you are right when you say that Christians have a different definition of love, but it really is not all that different than the definition of love that non-Christians have. For example, if a parent tells their child that it is wrong to lie, cheat, steal, would we say that, that the parent is causing self-hatred in the child. I mean, I do not think that we would really see it that way. What do you think? When my mom was tells me things about myself that I do not like to hear, do I think that my mom hates me. For the most part no, although she was kind of mean at times lol. If a parent did not tell their kid about anything wrong that they were doing we would actually say that, that is a bad parent. So why can family and friends tell us when we do something wrong but not the Bible?"

--Saying, 'Hey, don't steal that money. Someone else earned it,' is completely different from, 'Accept me into your heart, or else you'll suffer forever because you're sinful and deserve it.'

"I am writing too much right now so I want to briefly touch on the fear-based incentive. What is wrong with fear exactly? So I do not see what is wrong with fear, so I want to understand your perspective."

--Fear can make many do irrational things, especially to impressionable children. If you tell them that there is a place called hell, they'll become scared and believe you.

"If I did not fear that driving over the speed limit would get me a big fat ticket then I would keep speeding and not follow the law. And when I know someone loves me I see fear as closely related to respect. When a child fears/respect their parent then they will listen to what they say. When a parent says come home by midnight they will do it because they fear/respect their parent and know that there parent is looking out for their own good."

--Once again, the punishments are not the same in our world and the one the bible presents. Our punishments are temporary and concrete, while those listed in the bible are unseen and unproven.

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